China has just turned on the largest floating solar farm in the world. The farm is capable of pushing 40 megawatts of juice and floats on a manmade lake in Anhui, China, according to Sarah Zheng, a journalist with the South China Morning Post.

The plant at Anhui, China is built by Sungrow Power Supply and puts out enough juice to power 15,000 homes. This plant is twice the size of the previous record holder, also in the same region but built by a different company, Xinyi Solar, only a year back.

Ironically, the province of Anhui is a coal-rich area and where the power plant now floats was once heavily mined. According to Zhen, the lake varies in depth from twelve to thirty feet.

Building solar power plants on water offer a couple of big advantages over using land: The water helps to keep the electronics cool, and in the case of manmade lakes keep agricultural land and ecosystems from the harm of being developed.

While this project is ambitious and a milestone for water-based renewable energy, Sungrow Power Supply’s project is just one tiny piece of China’s renewable energy push. The Longyangxia Dam Solar Park on the Tibetan plateau has 4 million solar panels and puts out 850 megawatts of energy. That’s 21x more output than this lake’s juice. And, even that is small compared to the soon to be completed 6 million panel project in the Ningxia Autonomous Region, which is scheduled to put out 2 gigawatts of juice — enough to power 750,000 homes.

China has announced they will invest $361 billion in renewable power by 2020, and by 2022 may possibly produce 320 gigawatts of wind and solar power, and 340 gigawatts of hydropower. According to Zheng, currently a whopping 11 percent of China’s energy comes from renewable energy sources and may reach 20% by 2030.

China just turned on the world’s biggest floating solar power planthttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/solar_farm_floating_china_power_plant_sungrow_10-450x338.jpghttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/solar_farm_floating_china_power_plant_sungrow_10-150x150.jpg Damian Parsons FeaturedNews
China has just turned on the largest floating solar farm in the world. The farm is capable of pushing 40 megawatts of juice and floats on a manmade lake in Anhui, China, according to Sarah Zheng, a journalist with the South China Morning Post. The plant at Anhui, China is built...
China has just turned on the largest floating solar farm in the world. The farm is capable of pushing 40 megawatts of juice and floats on a manmade lake in Anhui, China, according to Sarah Zheng, a journalist with the South China Morning Post. The plant at Anhui, China is built by Sungrow Power Supply and puts out enough juice to power 15,000 homes. This plant is twice the size of the previous record holder, also in the same region but built by a different company, Xinyi Solar, only a year back. Ironically, the province of Anhui is a coal-rich area and where the power plant now floats was once heavily mined. According to Zhen, the lake varies in depth from twelve to thirty feet. Building solar power plants on water offer a couple of big advantages over using land: The water helps to keep the electronics cool, and in the case of manmade lakes keep agricultural land and ecosystems from the harm of being developed. <img class="size-full wp-image-11559 aligncenter" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/solar_farm_floating_china_power_plant_sungrow_10.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="600" /> While this project is ambitious and a milestone for water-based renewable energy, Sungrow Power Supply's project is just one tiny piece of China's renewable energy push. The Longyangxia Dam Solar Park on the Tibetan plateau has 4 million solar panels and puts out 850 megawatts of energy. That's 21x more output than this lake's juice. And, even that is small compared to the soon to be completed 6 million panel project in the Ningxia Autonomous Region, which is scheduled to put out 2 gigawatts of juice -- enough to power 750,000 homes. China has announced they will invest $361 billion in renewable power by 2020, and by 2022 may possibly produce 320 gigawatts of wind and solar power, and 340 gigawatts of hydropower. According to Zheng, currently a whopping 11 percent of China's energy comes from renewable energy sources and may reach 20% by 2030.



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