According to the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA), Kodi is lawful software and should not be targeted by anti-piracy groups and lawsuits.

This is in direct response to the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which recently described Kodi as a “global threat”.

The CCIA, which represents corporations such as Netflix, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Samsung, and Intel, states, “Unscrupulous vendors selling general-purpose devices preloaded with software whose function is to infringe content or circumvent technological protection measures (TPMs) are an appropriate target for enforcement activities…These enforcement activities should focus on the infringers themselves, however, not a general-purpose technology, such as an operating system for set-top boxes, which may be used in both lawful and unlawful ways.”

In essence, the CCIA is declaring that it’s not Kodi which should be targeted, it’s the users who are unlawfully using Kodi and the Kodi box sellers who are selling boxes bundled with add-ons made specifically for accessing copyrighted content.

CCIA which represents Netflix and Amazon says Kodi should not be targetedhttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/Kodi-823301-450x267.jpghttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/Kodi-823301-150x150.jpg Damian Parsons Tech
According to the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA), Kodi is lawful software and should not be targeted by anti-piracy groups and lawsuits. This is in direct response to the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which recently described Kodi as a 'global threat'. The CCIA, which represents corporations such as...
According to the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA), Kodi is lawful software and should not be targeted by anti-piracy groups and lawsuits.<span id="more-12271"></span> This is in direct response to the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which recently described Kodi as a "global threat". The CCIA, which represents corporations such as Netflix, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Samsung, and Intel, states, <i>"Unscrupulous vendors selling general-purpose devices preloaded with software whose function is to infringe content or circumvent technological protection measures (TPMs<em>) are an appropriate target for enforcement activities...These enforcement activities should focus on the infringers themselves, however, not a general-purpose technology, such as an operating system for set-top boxes, which may be used in both lawful and unlawful ways."</em></i> <img class="size-full wp-image-12272 aligncenter" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/Kodi-823301.jpg" alt="" width="590" height="350" /> In essence, the CCIA is declaring that it's not Kodi which should be targeted, it's the users who are unlawfully using Kodi and the Kodi box sellers who are selling boxes bundled with add-ons made specifically for accessing copyrighted content.



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