The wireless charging feature in devices hasn’t propagated greatly. The main setback for this technological principle is the consumers’ reluctance to invest in a wireless charger while riddled with uncertainty and confusion about what standard to choose.mediatek

At present, there exist two main standards of implementing the wireless charging concept. The Alliance for Wireless Power (A4WP) and Power Matters Alliance (PMA) make use of magnetic inductive charging, while competing giant, Qi from Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) makes use of resonant inductive charging.

Wireless chargers using magnetic charging utilize a generated electromagnetic field between the charger and the mobile device. The charger and the device, both, have inductive coils. The charger generates energy so that its inductive coil will produce an alternating electromagnetic field, which in turn charges the inductive coil of the device. Once an inductor is charged, it will be able to produce an appropriate form of electrical current as it dissipates its stored charge.

On the other hand, the Qi standard makes use of resonant inductive coupling, wherein the charger’s filters made up of inductors and capacitors are tuned to resonate with the filters in the mobile device. This standard allows for greater distances of wireless charging because of the resonant frequency setting of both energy transmitter and receiver.

The Problem

These two standards also operate at different frequency spectra. The differences make it a grueling task for consumers to make up their minds about wireless chargers. Smartphone manufacturers are torn as to which of the two standards to use.

The Solution

Fortunately, MediaTek has decided to save the day, they announced their Multi-mode wireless charging ASIC, the MT3188 at the MWC. The chip will enable devices to utilize either of the existing WPC, PMA, or A4WP chargers.

The MT3188 is powered up by the charger, making it possible for depleted batteries to still be charged. According to Taiwan-based company, the ASIC will be able to handle up to 7 Watts of power, with an adjustable voltage range from 1.5V to 5V.

MediaTek aims to make wireless charging possible across a variety of devices. The MT3188 supports resonant charging for out-of-band devices and devices which lack the provision for Bluetooth transceivers, with the use of their in-band communication technology. The chip will be readily compatible with devices using the MT6595, MT6732, and other SoCs, and it may also be used as a standalone.

Incorporating the chip will have a minimal cost, as it no longer requires any additional external components. This will definitely make a significant effect on the propagation of wireless charging technology. Users will no longer need to concern themselves about purchasing the compatible charger, so long as their device will feature an MT3188.

Wireless Charging from MediaTekhttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/mediatek.jpghttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/mediatek-150x150.jpg Nicky Arriola MediaTekRecent
The wireless charging feature in devices hasn't propagated greatly. The main setback for this technological principle is the consumers' reluctance to invest in a wireless charger while riddled with uncertainty and confusion about what standard to choose. At present, there exist two main standards of implementing the wireless charging concept....
The wireless charging feature in devices hasn't propagated greatly. The main setback for this technological principle is the consumers' reluctance to invest in a wireless charger while riddled with uncertainty and confusion about what standard to choose.<img class=" size-full wp-image-7700 aligncenter" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/mediatek.jpg" alt="mediatek" width="357" height="297" /><a href="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/MTK-e1428841378517.jpg"> </a> <span id="more-6655"></span> At present, there exist two main standards of implementing the wireless charging concept. The Alliance for Wireless Power (A4WP) and Power Matters Alliance (PMA) make use of magnetic inductive charging, while competing giant, Qi from Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) makes use of resonant inductive charging. Wireless chargers using magnetic charging utilize a generated electromagnetic field between the charger and the mobile device. The charger and the device, both, have inductive coils. The charger generates energy so that its inductive coil will produce an alternating electromagnetic field, which in turn charges the inductive coil of the device. Once an inductor is charged, it will be able to produce an appropriate form of electrical current as it dissipates its stored charge. On the other hand, the Qi standard makes use of resonant inductive coupling, wherein the charger's filters made up of inductors and capacitors are tuned to resonate with the filters in the mobile device. This standard allows for greater distances of wireless charging because of the resonant frequency setting of both energy transmitter and receiver. <h5><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Problem</span></h5> These two standards also operate at different frequency spectra. The differences make it a grueling task for consumers to make up their minds about wireless chargers. Smartphone manufacturers are torn as to which of the two standards to use. <h5><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Solution</span></h5> Fortunately, MediaTek has decided to save the day, they announced their Multi-mode wireless charging ASIC, the MT3188 at the MWC. The chip will enable devices to utilize either of the existing WPC, PMA, or A4WP chargers. The MT3188 is powered up by the charger, making it possible for depleted batteries to still be charged. According to Taiwan-based company, the ASIC will be able to handle up to 7 Watts of power, with an adjustable voltage range from 1.5V to 5V. MediaTek aims to make wireless charging possible across a variety of devices. The MT3188 supports resonant charging for out-of-band devices and devices which lack the provision for Bluetooth transceivers, with the use of their in-band communication technology. The chip will be readily compatible with devices using the MT6595, MT6732, and other SoCs, and it may also be used as a standalone. Incorporating the chip will have a minimal cost, as it no longer requires any additional external components. This will definitely make a significant effect on the propagation of wireless charging technology. Users will no longer need to concern themselves about purchasing the compatible charger, so long as their device will feature an MT3188.