Often the affect of video games on children is thought to be negative. Turns out this may not always be the case. In fact, according to this research, the trend is the opposite.

Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and Paris Descartes University took a look at the relation between time spent on video games and the mental health, cognitive development and social development of children, and found that playing video games seems to have a positive effect in children in these areas. Q5FJUK9OFH

Researches also found a correlation between high video game use and a lesser chance of peer relationship problems

Researchers at the above mentioned universities found that spending a lot of time playing video games coincided with 1.75x the chance of high intellectual function and 1.88x the chance of high overall educational prowess.

Contrary to some popular belief, there were no significant association with high video game use and an increased likelihood of child self-reported, or mother-, or teacher-reported mental health issues.

Researches also found a correlation between high video game use and a lesser chance of peer relationship problems.

The results of this report are based on data from School Children Mental Health Europe. Parents and teachers used a questionnaire to assess the children’s mental health. The children themselves also used an interactive tool to answer questions. Teachers gauged academic proficiency.

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Attributes associated with a lot of video game playing included being male, being older in the group of children tested (ages 6-11), and belonging to a medium sized family.

Interestingly, having a mother who was less educated or a mom who was single correlated with less time playing video games.

Says Katherine M. Keyes, PhD, assistant profess of Epidemiology at Mailman School of Puplic Health, “Video game playing is often a collaborative leisure time activity for school-aged children. These results indicate that children who frequently play video games may be socially cohesive with peers and integrated into the school community. We caution against over interpretation, however, as setting limits on screen usage remains and important component of parental responsibility as an overall strategy for student success.”

Researchers find video games may not be socially so bad afterall http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/OZ4IBMDS8E-450x338.jpghttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/OZ4IBMDS8E-150x150.jpg Damian Parsons NewsNoteworthyRecentSpecial
Often the affect of video games on children is thought to be negative. Turns out this may not always be the case. In fact, according to this research, the trend is the opposite. Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and Paris Descartes University took a look at the relation between...
Often the affect of video games on children is thought to be negative. Turns out this may not always be the case. In fact, according to this research, the trend is the opposite.<span id="more-9870"></span> Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and Paris Descartes University took a look at the relation between time spent on video games and the mental health, cognitive development and social development of children, and found that playing video games seems to have a positive effect in children in these areas. <img class="size-full wp-image-9872 aligncenter" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/Q5FJUK9OFH.jpg" alt="Q5FJUK9OFH" width="960" height="636" /> <blockquote>Researches also found a correlation between high video game use and a lesser chance of peer relationship problems</blockquote> Researchers at the above mentioned universities found that spending a lot of time playing video games coincided with 1.75x the chance of high intellectual function and 1.88x the chance of high overall educational prowess. Contrary to some popular belief, there were no significant association with high video game use and an increased likelihood of child self-reported, or mother-, or teacher-reported mental health issues. Researches also found a correlation between high video game use and a lesser chance of peer relationship problems. The results of this report are based on data from School Children Mental Health Europe. Parents and teachers used a questionnaire to assess the children's mental health. The children themselves also used an interactive tool to answer questions. Teachers gauged academic proficiency. <img class="size-full wp-image-9873 aligncenter" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/TFE3QMW4XY.jpg" alt="TFE3QMW4XY" width="960" height="640" /> Attributes associated with a lot of video game playing included being male, being older in the group of children tested (ages 6-11), and belonging to a medium sized family. Interestingly, having a mother who was less educated or a mom who was single correlated with less time playing video games. Says Katherine M. Keyes, PhD, assistant profess of Epidemiology at Mailman School of Puplic Health, "Video game playing is often a collaborative leisure time activity for school-aged children. These results indicate that children who frequently play video games may be socially cohesive with peers and integrated into the school community. We caution against over interpretation, however, as setting limits on screen usage remains and important component of parental responsibility as an overall strategy for student success."



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