Human brain surgery may soon get several steps easier, as a “smart scalpel”, which can detect cancerous brain tissue will soon begin human trials.

The scalpel was designed by Mexican David Oliva Uribe, and developed at Brussels, Belgium. It’s designed to be used during an operation on brain tumors which have already been diagnosed.

The smart scalpel is the size of a standard scalpel, but with a spherical tip less than one mm in diameter.

So far, the prototype has been used on artificial tumors and brain tissue from pigs. These tests have shown promising results and they are now looking towards entering human trials.

By touching the surface of tissue in the brain, the smart scalpel will provide its status within half a second via visual and/or auditory feedback.

brain-951845_640

According to Tecnológico de Monterrey, “Although imaging techniques such as an MRI and an ultrasound locate a tumor accurately before the surgery, during the cranial opening and throughout the surgical procedure there are many factors that can lead to the loss of this position, so the resection (the removing of the tumor) depends on the experience, as well as the senses of sight and touch of the surgeon”.

David Oliva, president of the Mexican Talent Network Abroad chapter Belgium, explains that the instrument is especially helpful in early stages of brain cancer, where abnormal tissue is difficult to visually differentiate from healthy tissue.

man-117588_6407

The device has been in development for six years, with the sensors and mechanical components made at the University of Hannover, Germany, and specialized neurosurgery hospitals. The digital processing was developed at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium (VUB).

Further, Oliva stresses that the prototype can eventually be miniaturized and adapted so it can be used in combination with endoscopy on tumors in other areas of the body, for example the stomach or intestines.

It’s also expected that the “smart scalpel” will eventually be used in robot assisted surgery.

Smart scalpel detects cancerhttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/man-117588_6407.jpghttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/man-117588_6407-150x150.jpg Damian Parsons NewsNoteworthyTech
Human brain surgery may soon get several steps easier, as a 'smart scalpel', which can detect cancerous brain tissue will soon begin human trials. The scalpel was designed by Mexican David Oliva Uribe, and developed at Brussels, Belgium. It's designed to be used during an operation on brain tumors which...
Human brain surgery may soon get several steps easier, as a "smart scalpel", which can detect cancerous brain tissue will soon begin human trials.<span id="more-10006"></span> The scalpel was designed by Mexican David Oliva Uribe, and developed at Brussels, Belgium. It's designed to be used during an operation on brain tumors which have already been diagnosed. The smart scalpel is the size of a standard scalpel, but with a spherical tip less than one mm in diameter. So far, the prototype has been used on artificial tumors and brain tissue from pigs. These tests have shown promising results and they are now looking towards entering human trials. By touching the surface of tissue in the brain, the smart scalpel will provide its status within half a second via visual and/or auditory feedback. <img class="size-full wp-image-10010 aligncenter" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/brain-951845_640.jpg" alt="brain-951845_640" width="640" height="452" /> According to Tecnológico de Monterrey, "Although imaging techniques such as an MRI and an ultrasound locate a tumor accurately before the surgery, during the cranial opening and throughout the surgical procedure there are many factors that can lead to the loss of this position, so the resection (the removing of the tumor) depends on the experience, as well as the senses of sight and touch of the surgeon". David Oliva, president of the Mexican Talent Network Abroad chapter Belgium, explains that the instrument is especially helpful in early stages of brain cancer, where abnormal tissue is difficult to visually differentiate from healthy tissue. <p style="text-align: center;"><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-10013" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/man-117588_6407.jpg" alt="man-117588_6407" width="368" height="477" /></p> The device has been in development for six years, with the sensors and mechanical components made at the University of Hannover, Germany, and specialized neurosurgery hospitals. The digital processing was developed at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium (VUB). Further, Oliva stresses that the prototype can eventually be miniaturized and adapted so it can be used in combination with endoscopy on tumors in other areas of the body, for example the stomach or intestines. It's also expected that the "smart scalpel" will eventually be used in robot assisted surgery.



Related Posts

New Samsung ISOCELL Fast 2L9 and Slim SX7 camera sensors announced

New Samsung ISOCELL Fast 2L9 and Slim SX7 camera sensors announced

Xiaomi Redmi 5 certification and rumored specs

Xiaomi Redmi 5 certification and rumored specs

Seagate releases fastest, highest capacity hard drives on the market

Seagate releases fastest, highest capacity hard drives on the market

Pixel 2 officially best phone camera. Steals Apple’s crown.

Pixel 2 officially best phone camera. Steals Apple’s crown.

Apple overtakes Google Pixel in the camera department

Apple overtakes Google Pixel in the camera department

GoPro Hero 6 specs, price, release date have been leaked

GoPro Hero 6 specs, price, release date have been leaked