Arch2O-Google-Glass-UI-07First Google Glass was introduced to developers, contest winners and those with connections. Now they will begin to be sold in limited numbers. If you’re going to try to get a product into the market as controversial and potentially society changing as this, this is the way to do it – slowly and in fits and starts.

I’ve often contemplated what the last 50 years of rapid tech advancement means for us as a whole. Maybe I’m in the minority of people who spend the majority of their waking hours in front of an LCD. Even if so, it can’t be denied that the general public has increased their screen hours drastically within the last 10 years as high speed rapid acquiring of data became commonplace world wide.

Think about that for a moment. When I say several years, I mean it.

It’s only been within the last several years that in-your-pocket devices capable of high-speed downloading with large beautiful LCD’s for media consument have become widely available at affordable prices. Think about that for a moment. When I say several years, I mean it. The first iPhone was introduced merely 7 years ago and only a scant % of the public adopted the new technology. It was a status symbol to own one of these things. It took several more years before they started to be everywhere.

circa 2010 will surely be seen as a huge turning point.

Make no mistake, you are living in an age of huge change in regards to how humans live and communicate with each other. I don’t just mean computers in general, I mean this very tight period of time over the last 5 years that relatively high-powered portable media machines have rapidly become a part of society. Though it’s impossible to tell exactly how the future will look at us, circa 2010 will surely be seen as a huge turning point.

Thus enters the subject of our post – Google Glass, which has now gone on sale to the general public in fits and starts. Many people have expressed outrage at this technology. Most of the protests have been regarding privacy. Google Glass has the capability of instantly being able to record video or take pictures.google-glass-wallpaper-hd2

Business Insider journalist Kyle Russell was attacked just yesterday. This was in public. Again in California. An assailant ran up to Mr. Russell, yelled ‘Glass’ and ripped the glasses off his face. The attacker then ran down the street and smashed the Google Glass onto the ground.

In regards to public areas, one might wish to spend their energy worrying about the government cameras which are recording and have all of this data going to a central database as opposed to if someone secretly snapped a picture of you in public with their Google Glasses.

Recently Sarah Solcum was attacked at a bar on Haight Street in San Francisco

I do see some reason to be a bit edgy when it comes to private businesses.  Perhaps there should be some sort of laws and rules established that don’t allow the wearing of them in privately owned establishments. Recently Sarah Solcum was attacked at a bar on Haight Street in San Francisco after refusing to remove the glasses. I think that in this case, she should have removed the glasses if patrons or the business owners requested it rather than keep them on and argue.

Another fear is people wearing them in locker rooms and bathrooms where people are in various states of undress, possibly with their bits hanging out and easily caught on Glass cam. This is nothing too new though. Pens which can record video and snap shots have been around for decades and are far more inconspicuous than Google Glass. Should we ban or inspect people’s pens in public institutions as well?

perhaps their hatred and distrust of the technology is actually spurred by subconscious envy?

I’ve got to wonder how much of this stems from jealousy. Google Glass is currently $1500. How many people can afford this interesting cool little gadget? Humans are naturally covetous, and perhaps their hatred and distrust of the technology is actually spurred by subconscious envy? How many of us made a huge issue out of $10 pens that can do the same thing. But when it comes to a $1500 gadget… People lose control.

Don’t get me wrong. I do believe there is some reason for concern. Especially when it comes to private areas such as bars, hospitals, locker rooms and the like. I just question the source of the rage.

Which brings me full circle. Trying to spend 20 minutes alone with a friend at my house without looking at my smartphone or notebook is an almost impossible chore. How has this technology changed us as humans and the way we interact? What did people do before wearable technology and carryable technology and the internet? Making love and communicating face to face is surely a couple of activities that have been replaced by our devices.

far less energy needed to be expended than a toss in the sack

Sex and pregnancies in the USA are on the decline. Different theories as to why have been presented, but I believe it’s strongly related to our little gadgets, which bring an instant sense of power and gratification with far less energy needed to be expended than a toss in the sack or having to think and make intelligent conversation.

These are some of the things I consider when taking a brief look at the stars, or have been sitting at my notebook for 10 hours straight working on the site and look across at my friend who’s been doing the same thing and I consider we hadn’t said more than 10 words to each other in the last 5 hours.

What I find interesting is that if forcing myself to be social, after the initial 20 minutes of uncomfortableness, I actually begin to truly enjoy the interaction.

Would love to hear your thoughts on some of the points presented here. I’m looking forward to continuing the conversation in the comments.

Google Glass – End of the Beginninghttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Arch2O-Google-Glass-UI-071.jpghttp://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Arch2O-Google-Glass-UI-071-150x150.jpg Damian Parsons GoogleOpinionRecentTech,,
First Google Glass was introduced to developers, contest winners and those with connections. Now they will begin to be sold in limited numbers. If you're going to try to get a product into the market as controversial and potentially society changing as this, this is the way to do...
<img class="size-full wp-image-4164 alignleft" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Arch2O-Google-Glass-UI-071.jpg" alt="Arch2O-Google-Glass-UI-07" width="300" height="169" />First Google Glass was introduced to developers, contest winners and those with connections. Now they will begin to be sold in limited numbers. If you're going to try to get a product into the market as controversial and potentially society changing as this, this is the way to do it - slowly and in fits and starts.<span id="more-4020"></span> I've often contemplated what the last 50 years of rapid tech advancement means for us as a whole. Maybe I'm in the minority of people who spend the majority of their waking hours in front of an LCD. Even if so, it can't be denied that the general public has increased their screen hours drastically within the last 10 years as high speed rapid acquiring of data became commonplace world wide. <blockquote>Think about that for a moment. When I say several years, I mean it.</blockquote> It's only been within the last several years that in-your-pocket devices capable of high-speed downloading with large beautiful LCD's for media consument have become widely available at affordable prices. Think about that for a moment. When I say several years, I mean it. The first iPhone was introduced merely 7 years ago and only a scant % of the public adopted the new technology. It was a status symbol to own one of these things. It took several more years before they started to be everywhere. <blockquote>circa 2010 will surely be seen as a huge turning point.</blockquote> Make no mistake, you are living in an age of huge change in regards to how humans live and communicate with each other. I don't just mean computers in general, I mean this very tight period of time over the last 5 years that relatively high-powered portable media machines have rapidly become a part of society. Though it's impossible to tell exactly how the future will look at us, circa 2010 will surely be seen as a huge turning point. Thus enters the subject of our post - Google Glass, which has now gone on sale to the general public in fits and starts. Many people have expressed outrage at this technology. Most of the protests have been regarding privacy. Google Glass has the capability of instantly being able to record video or take pictures.<img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-4023" src="http://www.gizbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/google-glass-wallpaper-hd2-450x266.jpg" alt="google-glass-wallpaper-hd2" width="450" height="266" /> Business Insider journalist Kyle Russell was attacked just yesterday. This was in public. Again in California. An assailant ran up to Mr. Russell, yelled 'Glass' and ripped the glasses off his face. The attacker then ran down the street and smashed the Google Glass onto the ground. In regards to public areas, one might wish to spend their energy worrying about the government cameras which are recording and have all of this data going to a central database as opposed to if someone secretly snapped a picture of you in public with their Google Glasses. <blockquote>Recently Sarah Solcum was attacked at a bar on Haight Street in San Francisco</blockquote> I do see some reason to be a bit edgy when it comes to private businesses.  Perhaps there should be some sort of laws and rules established that don't allow the wearing of them in privately owned establishments. Recently Sarah Solcum was attacked at a bar on Haight Street in San Francisco after refusing to remove the glasses. I think that in this case, she should have removed the glasses if patrons or the business owners requested it rather than keep them on and argue. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvTrx-i_nB4 Another fear is people wearing them in locker rooms and bathrooms where people are in various states of undress, possibly with their bits hanging out and easily caught on Glass cam. This is nothing too new though. Pens which can record video and snap shots have been around for decades and are far more inconspicuous than Google Glass. Should we ban or inspect people's pens in public institutions as well? <blockquote>perhaps their hatred and distrust of the technology is actually spurred by subconscious envy?</blockquote> I've got to wonder how much of this stems from jealousy. Google Glass is currently $1500. How many people can afford this interesting cool little gadget? Humans are naturally covetous, and perhaps their hatred and distrust of the technology is actually spurred by subconscious envy? How many of us made a huge issue out of $10 pens that can do the same thing. But when it comes to a $1500 gadget... People lose control. Don't get me wrong. I do believe there is some reason for concern. Especially when it comes to private areas such as bars, hospitals, locker rooms and the like. I just question the source of the rage. Which brings me full circle. Trying to spend 20 minutes alone with a friend at my house without looking at my smartphone or notebook is an almost impossible chore. How has this technology changed us as humans and the way we interact? What did people do before wearable technology and carryable technology and the internet? Making love and communicating face to face is surely a couple of activities that have been replaced by our devices. <blockquote>far less energy needed to be expended than a toss in the sack</blockquote> Sex and pregnancies in the USA are on the decline. Different theories as to why have been presented, but I believe it's strongly related to our little gadgets, which bring an instant sense of power and gratification with far less energy needed to be expended than a toss in the sack or having to think and make intelligent conversation. These are some of the things I consider when taking a brief look at the stars, or have been sitting at my notebook for 10 hours straight working on the site and look across at my friend who's been doing the same thing and I consider we hadn't said more than 10 words to each other in the last 5 hours. What I find interesting is that if forcing myself to be social, after the initial 20 minutes of uncomfortableness, I actually begin to truly enjoy the interaction. Would love to hear your thoughts on some of the points presented here. I'm looking forward to continuing the conversation in the comments.



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